Everyday life in Myanmar

Myanmar (former Burma) is the most unusual and distinctive country I’ve ever visited. Regardless of the common poorness – some sources say that average salary in Myanmar is about 27$ a month, and the country looks, well, as a country where the average salary is really 27$ a month – I will be glad to get here again and to travel the country in more detailed way for, say, a month.

IMG_0317 IMG_0297Myanmar men should pass six months monastery service. They mostly do it in the childhood.

IMG_0209People sell anything.

IMG_0322Make bonfires on the central streets.

IMG_0306Astrologers play major role in Myanmar. For example, in 2005, the capital was moved from Yangon to Naypyidaw strictly according to astrologer’s advices. Burma was renamed to Myanmar, again, at the time that was told by the astrologers. Anyone can consult an astrologer or a palmer.

IMG_0291Till 2012 Myanmar was ruled by Military junta. There were a lot of military conflicts, some are still going. Below is a social ad against the war.

There is a young boy at the ad. It is because children suffered much during Myanmar’s wars. During war conflicts, children were often used as a human shield, and sometimes were released to the minefileld for demining. Consciption age was at 12. In 2001, a group of 15 soldiers aged 13-15 put 15 women to death. Yangon is calm now.

IMG_0324Both, Myanmar men and women wear traditional long skirts.

IMG_9945Mostly women use traditional sunscreen cream.

IMG_9962Sometimes you can meet a hen walking on the street.

IMG_9974People like noodles. Unlike in the rest Indochina, noodles are being served with chicken bouillon and spicy salad that is itself is completely non-edible, but when added to the noodles, adds them a bit more spicyness.

IMG_9903Myanmar cuisine has a salad with tea leaves.

IMG_0313Needless to say, all this food is very cheap.

Street food.

IMG_9890 IMG_9889 IMG_9911Street ad.

IMG_0207Railway station.

IMG_0203Railway terminal.

IMG_0249 IMG_0247 IMG_0241Yangon.

IMG_0316

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