Ajaccio, Corsica

It is rather hard to get here on a tiny budget. You can fly from major French cities or to take a ferry from Marseille or Nice. Travel on a ferry will take about twelve hours.

The sunset.

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Early in the morning, the market on the main square starts to work.

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There are French and Corsican languages used. But mostly French.

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Ajaccio is a birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte. There is a memorial park, a hotel, a street, a cinema and a bunch of cafes named after him.

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Stylish touristic bus.

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Authentic clothing shop.

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The cinema “Bonaparte” right next to the cafe “Napoleon”.

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The Corsicans do like dogs, especially small and shaggy. The dogs sometimes walk by themselves and don’t hesitate to ask for food.

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The railway station.

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The abandoned summer cafe at a beach.

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The streets.

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The beach. The water at the beaches and even in the port is very clean.

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Corsicans greet each other with a hug and two kisses.

The food at the cafes and restaurants is very expensive. You need to cook by yourself. The cheapest cafe, where the locals eat had a breakfast for 10 euros. It is more popular at locals.

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On the opposite shore of the bay, there is an airport. It is convenient to watch planes take off and land.

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“Take care. It is cold now. “, – told me the host, – “By the way, where are you from?”.

“We are from Belarus. Be~la~rus? Where is it? I didn’t hear anything about this country.”

After I’ve shown her, where approximately it is, she asked a boyfriend. He didn’t know either.

But actually, the weather isn’t so cold. Early in the January morning the temperature is about 3-6 degrees, but during the day is raises to 20 degrees.

Meanwhile, there are tangerines and lemons on the trees. But the tangerines are still bitter at this season, so my plan of getting a free lunch in this expensive city has failed.

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There is a “siesta” time at Corsica. Normally it is a few hours after the midday, say, 1-3 PM. During siesta, the majority of the shops will be closed, as long as some cafes. The buses will go rare. The life freezes.

Children play on the main square.

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Even a simple walk is very relaxing.

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Serenity.

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Marseille

The city is awakening.

Someone is already awake.

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Someone is still sleeping.

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The pacifists are protesting against something.

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The police tries to calm them down.

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Condom vending machine for those who are shy.

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Marseille turned out to be a great surprise. I thought it’s just an ordinary regional capital, but would an ordinary regional capital have such fabulous architecture?

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There’s a basilique on the top of the city, with a charming view.

IMG_5311.JPGIMG_5299.JPG Some church.

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And one more.

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Modern art.

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The statue with binded eyes.

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All the buildings are white and have shutters.

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The city is a major seaport.

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